Generally, if you know a word starting with "post," you can't drop the "post" and stick "pre" on there unless you can drop the "post" and use it by itself. ", Ah, the amazing power of the WordReference dictionary, Interesting nichec, but I don't think I'm going to be using that word until it's far more popular, with all due respect to Mr. Webster. JavaScript is disabled. Antonyms for postpone include advance, bring forward, antedate, continue, do, expedite, forward, further, hasten and hurry. anticipate - WordReference.com Dictionary of English, anticipate | Origin and meaning of anticipate by Online Etymology Dictionary. In Indian English only there is the word 'prepone'. Can't we use "anticipate" or "antecipate" as the opposite for "postpone"? For example: Let's bring Friday's meeting forward to Tuesday. ", A postpones B" means "A changes the schedule, so that B will happen later than originally planned.". It is used daily and widely in the Indian subcontinent. Re 'shame', I was largely thinking of my experiences with French speakers. ?And can I say "The meeting was advanced from Saturday to (?) I was thinking of "prepone", but my native-english-fellows just started laughing. JavaScript is disabled. Then I thought, maybe we have 'antepone' since 'post' is after, while 'ante' is before. In other words, I can't think of an antonym, except for maybe "advanced. My English is American, and I hear "moved forward" or "brought forward" as acceptable, but I wouldn't use "pulled forward". Press J to jump to the feed. Cookies help us deliver our Services. postpone. Indians and South Asians in general have a very widely used, "prepone" as an opposite of postpone. prepone, opposite of postpone ︎ SEARCH ★ APP CONTACT; GIVE BACK TO THIS SITE; Sign language on this site is the authenticity of culturally Deaf people and codas who speak ASL and other signed languages as their first language. (I do sound pedantic often, but not when I can avoid it; I was aware of this word's existence, but I'm surprised it's made its way into a dictionary.). Webster's New Millennium™ Dictionary of English. So is it ok to say "The meeting was rescheduled to (do we use the preposition "to"?) Though you never know, prepone sounds comprehensible it might become a legal word given the number of english speaking south asians in the world. Prepone definition, to reschedule to an earlier day or time: Our Wednesday meeting has been preponed to Tuesday afternoon at 3:00. As an aside: Am I the only one who thinks that just because the word. In British English we would say "to bring forward", e.g. As you can see from the other responses, there are different ways of expressing the idea. It is noteworthy that the. "The budget increased due to the acceleration in the project's timetable." It can be used in a number of ways, normally with either bring or moved. So what's the truth? 英語の学びスペースです。, Press J to jump to the feed. Hopefully, it’s only a matter of time before the word catches on in the rest of the Anglosphere. ... What is the opposite of "postpone"? By using our Services or clicking I agree, you agree to our use of cookies. From the examples listed in the OED, prepone with this meaning appeared first in British English in the mid-twentieth century. Those that have used the word "forward" are correct. If someone tells me an event has been postponed and doesn't provide a date, I immediately forget about it, figuring they will get back to me with a date sometime. The matter is probably different in each culture. Not in English - well, certainly not in BE. I would, if I heard "preponed" without a revised date, also leave open the possibility that event may simply be abandoned. about apps & extensions feedback examples link … Un lieu pour apprendre l'anglais. deferment. #Wierd. If you want to find the right antonyms try using Thesaurus.com it really helps me a lot to find synonyms and antonyms. A perfect example is prepone, a word made to oppose postpone.If postpone means “to put off to a later time,” then prepone, logically, must mean “to move to an earlier time.”Here are some examples of its use: Tournament organisers have decided to prepone the inaugural ceremony. Hopefully, it’s only a matter of time before the word catches on in the rest of the Anglosphere. So I wasn't sure, but then I found this. Yes Paul Q, well said. As an AE speaker, I tend to use and hear "moved up" or "pulled forward" or simply "rescheduled.". Friday? Prepone antonyms. I believe such apparent corresoondences are called “false friends”. That said, I have a great fondness for English style and it is my native tongue, and I don't like you foreigners messing with it. Nor would I recommend its use to others, unless they wish to sound pompous or pedantic. definitions. Find more opposite words at wordhippo.com! The subsequent word in English is postpone. Merriam-Webster says it is widely used in India. It has also spread to Singapore and other Asian countries through Business English. I think that, if you read the whole thread, the answer is that most people who speak BE or AE will not understand you, but many people speaking English in India or south-eastern Asia will. Post means after in Latin. The opposite of postpone could logically be prepone. Antonyms for prepone include postpone, adjourn, delay, defer, stall, suspend, put off, shelve, hold up and make later. Vocabulary Words For Task 1: Reference Post. Top antonyms for prepone (opposite of prepone). I was thinking of "prepone", but my native-english-fellows just started laughing. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. But this isn't very elegant. prepone / antonyms. opposite meaning - 2 Lists. (Being a woman, this should definitely be my line of thinking). suggest new. “Prepone” has already entered the Oxford dictionary. Postpone antonyms. I'll let you know when I find the right word. If your audience is there, use it; if not, people will think you strange. I think the most idiomatic would be to say that something was "moved ahead" or "scheduled at an earlier time/date." I'm just having fun surfing on the inconsistent logic of the English tongue . antonyms. Why will they not understand the word (for it is self-explanatory)? https://www.dict.cc/englisch-deutsch/prepone.html, ‘Pushed forward’ could work (the meeting was pushed forward to Tuesday). The party was brought forward to Saturday, More posts from the EnglishLearning community, A place for learning english. Which would be to place before (something). So apologies, especially since what I said could easily be misunderstood. examples. Remember we have 'postnatal' and 'antenatal'. Its meaning is immediately obvious in context. So I wasn't sure, but then I found this. or use 'continue' if you want to say you didn't delay doing something. Top antonyms for prepone (opposite of prepone). It has also spread to Singapore and other Asian countries through Business English. I think we've reached a consensus, however: Where my statement may have been a little severe, it is true that if you used that word other than in India, you'll sound illiterate more often than not. ...To be explicit, it was post #42 I was thinking of. You can have a different opinion, but you can't disagree that that's how I feel about it. Log in. postpone. However, by the standards of current english vocabulary, thats a wrong word. Technically, we should add ante (which is Latin for before). "Prepone" is not even a word to people other than those in parts of the Indian subcontinent. Saying something "isn't a word" is subjective, but. So what's the truth? It is used daily and widely in the Indian subcontinent. Prepone antonyms. "Post" is not a separable prefix from "pone," and in my opinion, "prepone" shouldn't be used anywhere since it's not logical. "A postpones B" means "A changes the schedule, so that B will happen later than originally planned.". If a revised date is provided with the message of the postponement, it is clear that the event is still planned and expected to occur. IN India, people created the word “prepone” as the obvious opposite of postpone. Even if prepone is a word, though I'm not a native, I've never heard someone says 'prepone'. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. There is not some sort of 'language police' who are going to lock up folk for not speaking standard English; everyone has a right to get on with their lives, and to make use of the English language to help them go about their everyday business. opposite meaning - 2 Lists. The meeting was brought forward, for example. In some contexts it could be "accelerate", e.g. "Let's bring forward the meeting to Tuesday." 1530s, "to cause to happen sooner," a back-formation from anticipation, or else from Latin anticipatus, past participle of anticipare "take (care of) ahead of time," literally "taking into possession beforehand," from anti, an old form of ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp. Thus "prepone" as the logical opposite of postpone, as its antonym so to speak, makes perfect sense. examples. I actually got to the computer to try and find out if it could in any way help me...then I discover I'm not the only one. . The opposite of exceed could logically be deceed. Friday from Saturday." Something that has occurred to cause a postponement may (or may not) end up resulting in cancellation. So is it ok to say "The meeting was rescheduled to (do we use the preposition "to"?) On the Internet, a form of cyber-English has sprouted with such words as … In the United States, As an AE speaker, I tend to use and hear "moved up" or "pulled forward" or simply "rescheduled.". Well, as pointed out already in this thread, there isn't a single word for this in standard English. 'Brought forward' is the only suggested option that sounds remotely plausible to my ears. And try not to too focus on prefixes. In my context I am going with "rescheduled for an earlier time". It would be a very useful word, but unfortunately the verb "prepone" doesn't really exist outside of Indian English (if you look carefully at that dict.cc entry, you'll see it is marked as such). Can't we use "anticipate" or "antecipate" as the opposite for "postpone"? I think it is slightly vain to imagine that one way or another, you can 'prove' something on a forum like this. However, by the standards of current english vocabulary, thats a wrong word. preponing is constrained by the boundaries of time, but I fail to see why the need for a. date is more pressing here than it is with postpone. However, I can't find a. Indians and South Asians in general have a very widely used, "prepone" as an opposite of postpone. It has also spread to Singapore and other Asian countries through Business English. Prepone is not generally used at any level in my version of English. If they don't "like" the sound of it that's hardly a valid criticism, in my opinion. But I'd say, while I subscribe to the idea that there is one or several versions of 'correct' English, I don't think anyone needs to be ashamed that they are outside this definition. Webster's New Millennium Dict., formerly known as the Random House Unabridged (AE), does not consider the word unknown, rare, slang, or anything but normal: As far as the validity of "prepone" itself, it's a back-formation of "postpone," with the appended "pre-" ("pone" is itself not a word). (eg. However, I was thinking of it from a different perspective. Find more opposite words at wordhippo.com! Prepone is Indian English, or 'Babu English' as we endearingly call it in India. ? So I wasn't sure, but then I found this. Ponere is to place in latin. My English is American, and I hear "moved forward" or "brought forward" as acceptable, but I wouldn't use "pulled forward". You may use 'hurry' if you want to say make it faster. deferment. By way of explanation, 'A forum like this' - I was partly thinking of one or two posts in this 50+ thread, but mainly thinking of discussions on other websites. synonyms. in/ex, pre/post). antonyms. It drives home the meaning unequivocally. Does anyone have an idea what is the opposite of postponed for a meeting (= put earlier in time... but in one word)? I think that would be "The meeting has been brought forward ...". Yes, but it is more common to hear "from Saturday to Friday".

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